Down syndrome PLUS other challenges, like mental health

I’ve already blogged about having an adult daughter with Down syndrome and how that’s so much different from having a younger child with DS. It’s tougher in many ways: the gap between that child and your other non-DS kids, in addition to the gap between that child and most everyone else, is so much wider than it was when they were little. You’re used to the different life, sure, but there are still plenty of times you’re reminded how things would be if that child didn’t have DS. As your other children become adults or older teens, that gap is starker.

What also makes life more … eh, interesting … is when that child has other challenges on top of all that DS does. We as a family have been so blessed that our daughter, unlike about half of people with DS, never had heart problems. She didn’t require surgery. I have always been appreciative of that. For us, however, what’s been tough has been my daughter’s emotional health challenges. I’ve blogged lots about my own mental health, so look at all that for what I’ve experienced personally. Marissa has exhibited a lot of mood swings and meltdowns for probably about five years, and those have gotten so much more frequent and intense the past six months or year. Over a few years, the doctor and I have tried Prozac on her to see if that could help her feel a little less out of control, but it hasn’t helped. Now, however, with her just having such a hard time, I’ve been trying to figure out just what we can do from here.

Here’s the thing: I’ve already written about how difficult it can be to find a good mental health provider, particularly a medical doctor — psychiatrist — who specializes in these things. It’s hard for EVERYONE who finds themselves in need of a psychiatrist. There simply aren’t enough to address the need. That’s particularly the case in smaller communities or other underserved populations. And it’s a tragedy.

Add that to the difficulty of finding someone who has the extra skill to work well with someone with a learning disability, for whom it is much more difficult to understand and express the nuances of things they’re feeling, and the challenge can be overwhelming.

I’ve felt overwhelmed by various emotions: frustration, sadness, some anger, helplessness, inadequacy … the list goes on. I feel bad for my daughter because I know from personal experience (years of it!) how it is to feel so taken over by your emotions. I also know it must be particularly confusing and scary and sad for her. But then when it just goes on and on, day after day, and the things I try to do just don’t seem to help much, I feel frustrated and angry and depleted and just ready for it to STOP. For at least a little while.

I took her back to her regular physician a few weeks ago, in desperation, hoping that he and I might be able to come up with something to help. Just a start. I told him what I’ve struggled with personally and what medications have now helped me for the past two or three years. I told him how few resources there are. I told him, “I know this isn’t really in your wheelhouse, but…” Luckily, he is a good and kind man who is happy to listen and consider ideas and research them, and I trust him to do what he can. He said he’d look into some things and get back to me.

Meanwhile, I had my own check-in with my psychiatrist (well, she’s technically a nurse practitioner who specializes in psychiatry and she is FANTASTIC), who is at a clinic an hour away from here (and that my insurance doesn’t cover, so I pay out of pocket for each visit: $100 each time I have a check-in). I told her about my daughter and asked for some ideas. I felt it was the best option for M to go to this place, since I know they’re good and they specialize in this. But I was thinking they weren’t taking new patients, which wouldn’t help me at all. Luckily, I had taken her there maybe five years ago, when she wasn’t doing too badly, so I was able to get her in again. She has an appointment in two weeks.

Meanwhile, she is having blow-ups and meltdowns multiple times a day, sometimes, and it’s a strain on me and especially on her youngest sister. I’m just holding on until that appointment. And even then, these things take time. It’s going to be more of a challenge to help her than to just be the patient myself (that is tricky enough, believe me).

I am aware often of the multiple challenges people face. Children and adults with DS, like anyone else, have various needs and overlapping issues. It can just make it that much harder to deal with each of those things. I have such sympathy for the individuals with DS who have these needs, and I definitely understand the needs and feelings of their parents and families. Each of us is going through a unique mix of trials and challenges, and many of us go through those without others realizing. My daughter’s DS is obvious to others. What is not obvious is all the other things we are dealing with. My girl is such a sweetie and so loving and outgoing and friendly and happy, and that’s what most people see. They don’t witness the meltdowns and the moods. That’s reserved just for me and mine (yay! ha). Today, I share this to help others see what happens behind our doors some days, and so others in a similar situation as we are can perhaps find something to latch onto and know that I get it. I feel ya.

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She’s high and she’s low. Most people see this. I love this face. I love her all the time. But all the complexities and challenges can be exhausting.

Life with Down syndrome

lifeandlims View All →

I'm a book reviewer, editor, and writer with four daughters and tons of projects always keeping me hopping. I blog at Life and Lims and run the book review site Rated Reads.

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